North side of Rundle Street looking from Union Street (1924)
South side of Rundle Street, west of Frome Street (1910)
South side of Rundle Street, west of Union Street (1909)
South side of Rundle Street, 263-275 Rundle Street (1927)
South side of Rundle Street, 245-255 Rundle Street (1927)
South side of Rundle Street, 253-255 Rundle Street (1927)
South side of Rundle Street, 257-261 Rundle Street (1927)
South side of Rundle Street, 253-255 Rundle Street (1928)
South side of Rundle Street, 265-267 Rundle Street, Charlicks Building (1928)
East side of Union Street (1929)
North side of Rundle Street, east of Frome Street (1929)
South side of Rundle Street, east of Union Street (1929)
Looking west down Rundle Street from East Terrace (1929)
Looking south down Union Street from Rundle Street (1929)
North side of Rundle Street looking west, Exeter Hotel (1929)
South side of Rundle Street looking east (1929)
South side of Rundle Street, 275-285 Rundle Street (1933)
South side of Rundle Street, 245-251 Rundle Street (1936), current site of Nova Cinemas
West side of Union Street (1938)
South side of Rundle Street, west of Frome Street (1938)
Looking west down Union Street from Grenfell Street (1939)
The Stag Hotel (1941)
South side of Rundle Street, 249 Rundle Street (1952), current site of Nova Cinemas
Crown and Anchor Hotel (1952)
South Side of Rundle Street, from 281 Rundle Street looking west (1953)
South side of Rundle Street, 245 Rundle Street (1953) current site of Nova Cinemas
South side of Rundle Street, from 253 Rundle Street looking East (1953)
South side of Rundle Street, 285 and 287 Rundle Street (1953) current sites of Universal Wine Bar and Chopstix Restaurant
North side of Rundle Street looking East (1953)
South side of Rundle Street, former ANZ Bank and Charlicks Building (1978)
South side of Rundle Street, from 261 Rundle Street looking west (1958)
North side of Rundle Street, Tavistock Hotel (1962), since demolished to make way for Frome Street
North side of Rundle Street, Tavistock Buildings (1962)
South side of Rundle Street, from 237 Rundle Street looking west (1961)
South side of Rundle Street, west of Union Street (1961)
North side of Rundle Street, 272 Rundle Street (1963), current site of Scoozi Cafe
North side of Rundle Street, 272 Rundle Street (1963), current site of Scoozi Cafe
North side of Rundle Street, 276 Rundle Street (1969), current site of Pierruci
North side of Rundle Street, 232 Rundle Street (1969)
North side of Rundle Street, 266 Rundle Street (1969)
North side of Rundle Street, 236 Rundle Street (1970)
North side of Rundle Street, 278-284 Rundle Street (1972)
North side of Rundle Street, 240-244 Rundle Street (1972)
North side of Rundle Street looking west (1972)
North side of Rundle Street, 206-218 Rundle Street (1973)
Visit of the Prince of Wales, outside The Stag Hotel, Rundle Street and East Terrace (1920)
South side of Rundle Street, view of the Austral Hotel and looking east along Rundle Street
Exeter Hotel (1930)
Rundle Street being cemented (1910)
Rundle Street being cemented (1910)
Rundle Street being cemented outside The Stag Hotel (1910)
South side of Rundle Street, Charlicks Building (1978)
South side of Rundle Street looking west (1979)
South side of Rundle Street, 253-261 Rundle Street (1979)
South side of Rundle Street, 229 Rundle Street (1980)
North side of Rundle Street looking west (1905)
South side of Rundle Street looking west (1961)
South side of Rundle Street outside The Stag Hotel (1921)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market (1989)
East End Market, Grenfell Street (1989)
Frontage of East End Market, East Terrace (1989)
East End Market, Grenfell Street (1989)
East End Market, looking west down Rundle Street (1989)

Early 1900’s to the late 1980’s

The Adelaide Fruit & Produce Exchange Co. Ltd

Rundle Street was named after Mr John Rundle, a Director of the South Australia Company and member of the House of Commons, by the Street Naming Committee on 23 May 1837. The street was installed with the first electric street lighting in South Australia in 1895 at the former intersection of Rundle, King William and Hindley streets.

At the beginning of the 20th Century, Mr William Charlick, who had founded Charlick Bros. in 1881 (a fruit, potato and grocery business) at the “original” East End Market with his brother, retired from the grocery side of the business to form William Charlick Ltd – wholesale fruit and potato merchants.
Realising that the East End Market (located on the north side of Rundle Street) was again outgrowing its site, he acquired the land between Rundle and Grenfell Streets and began to negotiate with The East End Market Co Ltd to extend their site. However, after protracted discussions, the negotiations failed. Mr Charlick then decided to pursue his idea of building a new modern market on his own land.

Enlisting the support of growers, merchants and the City Council, a Bill was passed in 1903 empowering Mr Charlick to develop a new market, but not exceeding four acres in area, which was to be completed by 1908, with the City Council having the power to take over the market (at its then value) some time in the future. This option was never exercised by the Council.

The Adelaide Fruit and Produce Exchange Co Ltd was quickly formed with a capital of £40,000, and on the 2nd of May 1904, the new market was opened for business. Various extensions ensued over the next few of years, and by 1910, there were 390 grower’s stands (with provision for their vehicles and teams), 20 large packing stores, 11 small stores, 10 side stores, a refreshment room and a blacksmith.

Nearly four acres had been developed for market purposes at a cost of nearly £52,300 – for land and buildings. The market was described as “the best of its character in Australia – lofty, well ventilated, wide roads, no obstacles, automatically drained, and kept wonderfully clean”. The original Chairman was Mr W. Charlick, with Mr T.H. Brooker as Secretary. The market soon became known as “The New Market”, with the original site across the road (north side) known as “The Old Market”.

The markets traded successfully up until the late 1980’s at which time they were relocated out of the City to the northern suburb of Pooraka. This then created an exceptional and rare opportunity to redevelop the four acre site, bounded by Rundle, Union and Grenfell Streets and East Terrace.
Please refer to the historic PHOTO GALLERY (courtesy of the State Library of South Australia) below to take a memorable walk through time and re-visit what once was. You can simply sit back and let the slideshow run its course or move through the images as you please – either way, enjoy the journey!!!

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